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More field sampling in Sitka

The process of sampling all of our experimental tide pools in Sitka is slowly coming to an end for this trip. We carried out several rounds of water sampling for water chemistry during the daytime and nighttime, along with surveying diversity in the pools and prepping the pools for the future summer experiment.

Taking water samples for the pH and alkalinity measurements that go into assessing acidification in the pools is incredibly tedious, since it requires a certain amount of care. We draw water up from the bottom of the pool, then slowly distribute … Continue Reading

Alaska in January

In collaboration with Cascade Sorte and Matt Bracken from UC Irvine, and Kristy Kroeker from UC Santa Cruz, we are currently up in Sitka Alaska carrying out seasonal sampling for our NSF-funded project “Collaborative Research: Effects of Multiple Aspects of Climate Change on Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning”. Much of the current trip’s work centers around sampling water chemistry conditions in our focal tide pools and surveying what’s living in them (algae and invertebrates).

Water sampling is hard when the tidepool is frozen.

We have a … Continue Reading

Tidepool nutrient cycling manipulations

Summer number 1 of our collaborative research project with the Bracken and Martiny lab groups at UC Irvine is proceeding nicely. Our teams have been manipulating mobile grazers, such as limpets, littorine snails, chitons, and hermit crabs, in experimental tidepools in order to measure the growth responses of the photosynthetic algae in these pools (among many other variables we are measuring). Those algae need to take up nutrients from the tidepool water in order to grow, including nitrogen products, which the herbivore grazers just happen to be recycling through their urine as they eat other algae in the pools.

[caption id=”attachment_2440″ … Continue Reading

We’ve moved

As of August 2018, I relocated my lab, and everything else in my life, to San Diego. I have joined the San Diego State University Biology Department as an Assistant Professor.

If you are a student interested in undergraduate, masters, or Ph.D. research opportunities in marine ecophysiology, biomechanics, and climate change impacts on rocky shore and nearshore communities, feel free to contact me at my school email (the email is real hard to figure out, so good luck).

For non-academic inquiries about content on this site, please continue to use the … Continue Reading

Field work at Bodega Marine Lab

Last week was the kickoff a new project looking at diversity and productivity effects of nutrient and temperature alterations in high intertidal pools. This work is being done in collaboration with Matt Bracken’s Marine Biodiversity Lab group at UC Irvine. Pictured below are Dylan Projansky from SJSU, Matt Bracken (center), Genevieve Bernatchez (UCI), and Samuel Bedgood (UCI, bending over reading the YSI DO sensor).

Evening sampling in the high intertidal zone.

Conference live tweets revisited

Having just returned from the 100th Anniversary meeting of the Western Society of Naturalists meeting in Monterey, it seems like a fine time to generate some new summary data of trends in live-tweeting meetings. I originally addressed this some time last year in this original post: https://lukemiller.org/index.php/2016/01/is-live-tweeting-meetings-losing-steam-scicomm/. Since that time, there’s been new iterations of the WSN meeting and the Ecological Society of America meeting. I’ve scraped the Twitter archives for the relevant meeting hashtags (#wsn100 and #esa2016), and removed all retweets, so that only ‘original’ tweets are tallied here.
WSN 2016
Shown first below are the meeting totals for the … Continue Reading

Student poster presentation at WSN 2016

It was the 100th anniversary of the formation of the Western Society of Naturalists this year. While WSN was originally a society with fairly broad interests in the terrestrial and marine realms, in the last few decades it has very much become focused on marine habitats, with the occasional estuarine or terrestrial presentations popping up. I try to make a point of going every year, since it’s a great way to catch up on marine science along the west coast of North America (and elsewhere on the globe), and it’s a very student-focused meeting, with at least half of the … Continue Reading

“Robomussels” in the New York Times

Robomussel in mussel bed at Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA.

Robomussel in a mussel bed at Hopkins Marine Station, Pacific Grove, CA.

For several years, starting first at UC Santa Barbara around 1999/2000, and then in the mid 2000’s and early teens at Hopkins Marine Station, I would spend one or two low tides per year going out to the seashore and gluing fake plastic mussels into the middle of real mussel beds (as shown above). These ‘robomussels’ were originally created by Brian Helmuth (now of Northeastern University), … Continue Reading

My work as a snail whisperer and professional killjoy

Littorina littorea from Quoddy Head, Maine. Photo by me.

Littorina littorea periwinkle snails from Quoddy Head, Maine. Photo by me.

The New York Times online Science section published a short piece earlier this month by Joanna Klein about humming to periwinkles.

Joanna contacted me for some background on this story, which has a simple premise:
People who grew up in coastal New England know this trick: To coax a periwinkle snail out of its shell, hum to it.
This was news to me, but also sounded crazy enough that there might … Continue Reading

Tidal datums and shifting baselines

I recently dredged up an old poster on tide heights and tidal datums that several of us put together back in graduate school and presented at the Western Society of Naturalists meeting in either 2003 or 2004. This was a hot topic (for 5 or so people) at the time, since the national tidal datums for the United States had all just been updated.

Click for the pdf copy of the poster

Click for the pdf copy of the poster

This poster discusses how the tidal datum, i.e. the location … Continue Reading